Gypsy's Travels


Saturday, March 28, 2009

PhotoHunt - "Hands"

These are the hands of women in Japan, sitting on their bent legs, tying fabric for dyeing.
Kumo shibori
Kumo shibori is a pleated and bound resist. This technique involves pleating sections of the cloth very finely and evenly. Then the cloth is bound in very close sections. The result is a very specific spider-like design. This technique is very precise in order to produce this specific design.
This silk fabric is pulled up tightly on thread. The dots on the fabric to the right show where the stitches should go. The fabric on the left side has already been tied. The completed width of the tied fabric will be 4-6" until after it is dyed and released.

Muira Shibori
Muira Shibori is also known as looped binding. It involves taking a hooked needle and plucking sections of the cloth. Then a thread is looped around each section twice. The thread is not knotted; tension is the only thing that holds the sections in place. The resulting dyed cloth is a water-like design. Because no knot is used, muirea shibori is very easy to bind and unbind. Therefore, this technique is very often used.
This woman's fingers were flying so fast, it was hard to catch her action. She wrapped the moistened thread around the silk fabric and pulled it tight. It will tighten even more as it dries. She is in her 80's and has been doing this work since she was 7 years old.

17 comments:

  1. Isn't it incredible? Makes Mom's hands hurt just thinking of the cramps they must get.

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  2. Nice shot and great information.

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  3. very cool "in action" pics

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  4. Such patience!

    I played today with wedding hands!

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  5. clever and talanted hands depicted here. Great photos. Judith

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  6. thanks for the comment. nice shot. thanks for sharing.

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  7. oh hands at work are so inspiring

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  8. Lovely take and interesting bit of info. Have a great weekend!

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  9. Wonderful post! I love learning about other places.
    My Photo Hunt is up! I hope you get a chance to visit me, too.

    http://ilovenewyorktravel.net/photo-hunters-hands/

    Happy weekend!

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  10. How neat and interesting!

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  11. That makes my knees hurt!
    Great photo hunt.

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  12. I've never watched this done, but I've watched other similar displays of skill in the sewing and related field, and always wonder "How do they do that without stitching themselves into the work??"

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  13. What an interesting post!! Thank you for the visit as well!

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  14. Great crafts are still made by bare hands. Love the photos. Thanks for the visit.

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  15. I loved this! It made me very frustrated though, because seeing the artists do the work made me very much want to see the resulting dyed fabric. I'll have to go do some Googling. . .

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  16. I love these interesting forms of dyeing fabric... and it is great to see that there is a world-wide interest in these techniques, these days.

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